Vested rights don’t hold water

In the continuing struggle to secure its future, the state of Georgia is still being threatened with court challenges to the idea that Atlanta and surrounding communities can draw drinking water out of Lake Lanier, as they have since it was built, over 50 years ago.

Proposition 8, the definition of marriage as being a joining of a male and a female, voted on and approved for the California constitution by the majority of Californians, was trashed by the Supreme Court, because of what they called the “vested rights” of the 18,000 gay activists that rushed through and got “married” during the legal window before the vote of the population could be heard.

So why do the gay activists have “vested rights” that overturn the state constitution, but the people who have lived and drunk out of Lake Lanier for the past 50 years NOT have any “vested rights”?

Why does vested rights always seem to only be applicable when it fits the leftist lib-prog agenda?  Rights apply in a republic too.

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About drrik

3rd career and 2nd childhood. Spends spare time repairing old things. Aspires to burn more gasoline, gunpowder, and ink in pursuit of slowing down. Child of the 60s and aspiring student of history. No desire to see us repeat the failed social experiments that keep failing for lack of human beings that meet the left wing standards and have to be killed off. Did engineering long enough to realize that very little is new and the wheel does not need to be reinvented.
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